Heart Of Nutrition

Erin Naimi, R.D., CEDRD Nutrition Therapist

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Resources

  • Eating Disorders
  • An Eating Disorder serves as a coping mechanism in the absence of other, healthier ways of managing difficulty and distress. Eating Disorders are emotionally based and the behaviors are only a symptom to the disease. The disordered eating behaviors are only an attempt to numb, control, avoid, and forget the emotional pain that underlies the disease.

  • An eating disorder will not simply resolve on its own and may turn into a lifelong battle if not addressed.

  • As a nutrition therapist Erin works with individuals to redefine their relationship with food in a more safe and healthy manner. Our work will encompass such topics as: food myths and beliefs, one’s emotional and behavioral relationship with food, metabolism, exercise resistance, body image concerns, etc. Erin understands that the decision to begin treatment doesn't mean you're ready to let go of your eating disorder, just that you're willing to look at a different way of living.
  • Anorexia Nervosa
  • Persistent restriction of energy intake leading to significantly low body weight (in context of what is minimally expected for age, sex, developmental trajectory, and physical health) .

  • Either an intense fear of gaining weight or of becoming fat, or persistent behaviour that interferes with weight gain (even though significantly low weight).

  • Disturbance in the way one's body weight or shape is experienced, undue influence of body shape and weight on self-evaluation, or persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight.


Subtypes:


Restricting type

Binge-eating/purging type

  • Bulimia Nervosa
  • Recurrent episodes of binge eating. An episode of binge eating is characterised by both of the following:

    • Eating, in a discrete period of time, an amount of food that is larger than most people would eat during a similar period of time and under similar circumstances.

    • A sense of lack of control over eating during the episode (e.g. a feeling that one cannot stop eating or control what or how much one is eating).

  • Recurrent  compensatory behaviour in order to prevent weight gain, such as self-induced vomiting, misuse of laxatives, diuretics, or other medications, fasting, or excessive exercise.

    • The binge eating and  compensatory behaviours both occur, on average, at least once a week for three months.

    • Self-evaluation is unduly influenced by body shape and weight.

  • Binge Eating Disorder
  • Recurrent episodes of binge eating. An episode of binge eating is characterised by both of the following:
  • Eating, in a discrete period of time, an amount of food that is  larger than most people would eat during a similar period of time and under similar circumstances.

  • A sense of lack of control over eating during the episode (e.g. a feeling that one cannot stop eating or control what or how much one is eating).]

  • The binge eating episodes are associated with three or more of the following:
    • eating much more rapidly than normal
    • eating until feeling uncomfortably full
    • eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry
    • eating alone because of feeling embarrassed by how much one is eating
    • feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed or very guilty afterward
  • Marked distress regarding binge eating is present

  • Binge eating occurs, on average, at least once a week for three months
  • Night Eating Syndrome
  • Recurrent episodes of night eating. Eating after awakening from sleep, or by excessive food consumption after the evening meal. The behaviour is not better explained by environmental influences or social norms. The behaviour causes significant distress/impairment.
  • What you can do to help
  • If you have an eating disorder and are ready for help….

Taking the first step is often the most challenging. It is also one of the most important steps in your journey to recovery. Making the decision to ask for help doesn't have to mean you're ready to change, just that you're willing to look at a different way of living. Speak with someone you trust. Contact a friend, family member, therapist, nutritionist, doctor, or a treatment center (see RESOURCES).

   
  • If you know someone with an eating disorder…..
    • Be honest, supportive, and encouraging.
    • Be a good listener. Your support is needed more than your advice.
    • Let them know about your concerns and observations.
    • Let them know you are available and wiling to help.
    • Do NOT be judgmental or threatening.
    • Do NOT expect or ask that they can just stop their behaviors.
  • Resources on eating disorders